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20130706
20130714
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in order. we have seen some good news with an economy that recovers. we have seen our annual deficit numbers go down, although i have to be somewhat -- look with somewhat jaundiced eyes when the press is saying hallelujah, this year our deficit may be only $746 billion. that still is not -- is not good enough. and the solution set that we're looking for is not that far away. so in a moment, i'm going to make a couple comments and then ask my colleague, the medicare of our budget committee, to once again make an offer to proceed with regular order, something that has been the back stop of this debate about rules, something that our colleagues on the other side of the aisle, perhaps appropriately, beat us over the head for three years on about the fact that we ought to have a regular order around the budget. well, it's now been 110 days since the united states senate approved a budget. after a marathon session that went until 5:00 in the morning, a session that i think even our colleagues on the other side who didn't vote for the budget would agree was open and appropriate to rules and
rates to the market without a cap to protect students. this proposal would pay down the deficit on the backs of students, trading national debt for student debt. trading national debt for student debt. it is unacceptable, the letter goes on, to use student loans as a vehicle for deficit reduction, especially when the federal government is projected to make $51 billion on student loans just this year. so that will be the vote tomorrow. and, madam president, i ask consent that this letter, along with the list of the organizations supporting the one-year extension, appear at this point in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. harkin: so that's -- that's really the vote tomorrow. are we going to keep 3.4% or are we going to allow it to double? that's the essence of the vote tomorrow. now, there is a lot of different ideas floating around about what to do, how to do this, but in just about every single case, every one of those bills, if you project out over the next couple of three years, will raise interest rates higher than 6.8%. so again, that's why extending i
student loan interest rates at current levels for two years without adding a penny to the deficit. because of this obstruction, loan rates doubled on july 1, piling thousands of dollars more of debt, mor that more than 7 mn students owe. republicans are push planning to balance the budget right on the backs of struggling students. if the legislation passed by house republicans or the plan by senate republicans becomes law, student loan rates would more than double over the next few years as interest rates increased. the speaker, speaker boehner, has said that the house has acted and now the ball is in the senate's house. we talked about that yesterday, madam president. what is he talking about? they've acted and now we should act. i guess we could talk about what he this didn't do last year on the farm bill. i guess we could talk about what they didn't do last year on the post office. i guess we could talk about what they haven't done this year on the farm bill. we could talk about what they haven't done that is so devastating to small businesses around america; that is, having people who
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3